Put Your Children First After a GA Divorce

Atlanta Divorce Parenting Plans | Nancy GhertnerPut Your Children’s Needs First After a Divorce in Georgia

Children can be traumatized by the breakup of their mom and dad’s marriage. All of a sudden both parents no longer live with them in the same house. “Where did Mommy or Daddy go?” they may ask.

If your children are old enough to understand what is going on, you and your spouse should sit down with them and explain that mom and dad are no longer going to be married. Reassure your children that they will always have mom and dad in their lives, even when they primarily live with the custodial parent.

I have seen a lot of clients who made the decision early on to put their kids first, regardless of how they felt about their ex. It will help all parties involved if the children can see mom and dad smiling and getting along.

Neither parent should speak ill of the other parent, nor ask a child to tell the parent what is going on in the other parent’s lives. Both of you are still role models for your children, so let them see how two grownups can interact in a healthy way.

Kids just want to be kids, which means they crave security and love from both parents. Unfortunately, I have seen situations where one or both parents harbored such hard feelings for each other that their children were subjected to angry outbursts and fighting.

Or one parent tried to undermine their ex by “forgetting” to pick up the children from school, thus frightening the children.

What Do I Do If My Ex Tries to “Sabotage” the New Parenting Agreement?

Sometimes one of the parties in a divorce simply refuses to cooperate with the new parenting plan, and takes liberties with the parenting time schedule, or allows the children to do what they want unsupervised all day.

If a judge in Georgia finds out that one or both parents are acting irresponsibly and are possibly putting their children in dangerous situations, the judge may reverse the original living arrangement and award physical custody to the other parent or legal guardian.

If a non-custodial parent demonstrates that the custodial parent has become unfit or unable to care for a child, this can also justify a custody modification.

If the situation is urgent, for example, if the custodial parent has developed a mental illness or a drug abuse problem, a Georgia court may order the affected parent to undergo a mental health evaluation, or seek help with their addiction.

Contact Atlanta family lawyer Nancy Ghertner today and meet with her to learn how to set up a parenting plan that is in the best interests of your children. Nancy’s will meet with you in her convenient Sandy Springs office at the top of the Perimeter.