Stick to Court-Ordered Custody Agreements During Covid 19

These 7 excellent tips came to me from those in the know and they were so helpful that I’d like to share them with you one at a time!

Guidelines for Parents Who Are Divorced/Separated and Sharing Custody of Children During the COVID 19 Pandemic

From the leaders of groups that deal with families in crisis:

Susan Myres, President of American Academy of Matrimonial Lawyers (AAML)
Dr. Matt Sullivan, President of Association of Family and Conciliation Courts (AFCC)
Annette Burns, AAML and Former President of AFCC
Yasmine Mehmet, AAML
Kim Bonuomo, AAML
Nancy Kellman, AAML
Dr. Leslie Drozd, AFCC
Dr. Robin Deutsch, AFCC
Jill Pena, Executive Director of AAML
Peter Salem, Executive Director of AFCC

3 of 7. Be Compliant With Court Orders and Custody Agreements

“As much as possible, try to avoid reinventing the wheel despite the unusual circumstances. The custody agreement or court order exists to prevent endless haggling over the details of timesharing. In some jurisdictions there are even standing orders mandating that, if schools are closed, custody agreements should remain in force as though school were still in session.”

Help For Divorced Parents With Children During Covid (Tip 2 of 7)

These 7 excellent tips came to me from those in the know and they were so helpful that I’d like to share them with you one at a time!

Guidelines for Parents Who Are Divorced/Separated and Sharing Custody of Children During the COVID 19 Pandemic

From the leaders of groups that deal with families in crisis:

Susan Myres, President of American Academy of Matrimonial Lawyers (AAML)

Dr. Matt Sullivan, President of Association of Family and Conciliation Courts (AFCC)

Annette Burns, AAML and Former President of AFCC

Yasmine Mehmet, AAML

Kim Bonuomo, AAML

Nancy Kellman, AAML

Dr. Leslie Drozd, AFCC

Dr. Robin Deutsch, AFCC

Jill Pena, Executive Director of AAML

Peter Salem, Executive Director of AFCC

2 of 7. Be Mindful

Be honest about the seriousness of the pandemic but maintain a calm attitude and convey to your children your belief that everything will return to normal in time. Avoid making careless comments in front of the children and exposing them to endless media coverage intended for adults. Don’t leave the news on 24/7, for instance. But, at the same time, encourage your children to ask questions and express their concerns and answer them truthfully at a level that is age-appropriate. #covid19divorce, #nancyghertner, #atlantadivorcelawyer #socialdistancing

Georgia Antenuptial (Prenuptial and Postnuptial) Law Changes for 2019

By: Nancy Ghertner, Atlanta Family Lawyer

How to Do a Georgia Prenup

A new marriage agreement law (HB 190) was passed recently by the Georgia House of Representatives that now requires a prenup or postnup agreement to be in writing, signed by both parties, and attested to by a notary and at least one witness. Prior to the passage of this change in the law a prenup or postnup could be made verbally and still hold up in court.

I can help you craft a legally-binding document that protects your individual assets and ensures your financial directives (wills and probate) to children from a previous marriage stay intact.

How to Have a Healthy Prenup Conversation with Your Fiancé

You are in love and are planning to get married, but first you want a prenuptial agreement (Georgia prenup) in writing. The subject is an emotional one since it brings up the possibility of a divorce into the otherwise loving moments of wedding and honeymoon planning.

I would suggest you begin the conversation with your fiancé by saying something like, “Honey, let’s talk about a prenup.” Make it clear you are not expecting your marriage to end in divorce but instead you view a prenup the same as an insurance policy. No one expects to ever have to use it for an emergency, but it is nice to know it is there just in case.

Be clear about why you think a prenup is a good idea. Explain any life experience you had that leads you to believe you need this agreement before you get married. For example, you could say something like, “After my first marriage ended, I was financially disadvantaged for years and I just can’t go through that again.”

If You Didn’t Do a Prenup Before the Wedding, You Can Always Prepare a Postnup Now

A postnup covers the same marital decisions as a prenup. The only difference is a postnup can be prepared after you have been married. You may feel more comfortable talking about a postnup with your spouse after your relationship has grown stronger. I have worked for over 30 years with married couples who decided to get a postnup done for their own piece of mind. Once put in writing, signed by both spouses in front of a notary and one other witness (me), you can throw the document in a drawer and forget about it – go be happily married forever!

Allow for Changes in the Final Prenuptial or Postnuptial

As time passes and life events unfold (babies born, career changes, major health issues) there may be a need to change the terms of the agreement. Provide for this contingency in your original plan. You can also add a “sunset clause” provision whereby the agreement will expire on a certain date.

One area of family law that cannot be included in a prenup or postnup is child support and child custody. In case a divorce is inevitable after you have children, a family law judge will decide who the children live with, and which spouse will make support payments.

Marriage is both a social contract and a financial partnership. The more comfortable and secure you feel about your shared financial growth as a couple, the better the union.

Keys To Success In A Family Owned Business

Almost everyone who shops knows Walmart is the largest family owned business in the United States. The company now has 11,000 stores in 27 countries with annual worldwide net sales of more than $482 billion. The founder, Sam Walton, opened his first store in Arkansas in 1962 and, as the saying goes, the rest is history. Although Walmart is now owned by stockholders, Walmart family members own the controlling shares of stock.

In 1869, Henry John Heinz started his business making his first product: horseradish. His famous ketchup appeared on the market seven years later. It now sells 650 million bottles of ketchup every year. When John Heinz died in a plane crash in 1991, his wife Teresa took over the management of the family business.

Levi Strauss, owner of a dry goods store, became passionate about a new type of men’s pants designed by his partner, Jacob Davis.  They obtained a patent and began selling their blue jeans in 1872.  When Strauss died childless, he left the business to his two nephews, one of whom brought his son-in-law, Walter Haas, in to the business. The business is still run by Strauss and Haas descendants.

There are many other examples of family owned businesses that have thrived for years. They all have some elements in common that contribute to their longevity and success.

  • Passion: The driving force behind the success of the family owned businesses is the passion the members have for the product or business and the connection they feel to their family members as they all work together toward their common goal.
  • Values as important as wealth: The founders of the business have a compulsion to transfer their values, such as their work ethic, volunteering in the community and philanthropy, to their family members who they bring in to the business. Transferring wealth is important but takes a back seat to values. Almost all successful family businesses have a track record of philanthropy and charitable giving.
  • New generations learn from the older ones: As young family members enter the business, they are willing to listen to their older family members as mentors. They respect how the business has been conducted through the years and recognize it as key to its current success.
  • Older generations learn from the younger ones: The older generations are willing and eager to listen to the new ideas and introduction of new technology by the new family members. Both generations respect what they can learn from each other.
  • Keep the family and business reputation intact: Both generations are cognizant of the business and family reputation. They are aware that how they act outside the business and how they treat other people will reflect on the entire family and on the business.

Family members who work long hours together for the success of their business find they need to create balance. They need to respect each other and the time they each need away from the business. They also need pleasant family gatherings where they do not talk about business and enjoy being together as family members, not just business associates.

How To Ask for a Prenuptial Agreement | Georgia Prenup

How to Do a Georgia PrenupYou are in love and are planning to get married, but first you want a prenuptial agreement (Georgia prenup). The subject is an emotional one since it interjects the possibility of a divorce into the otherwise loving moments of wedding and honeymoon planning.

Those that have “been there, done that” have suggestions that may make it easier for you to broach the subject with your soon-to-be spouse.

Engage in a Conversation – Let’s Talk About a Prenup

Do not start by making a demand like, “I want a prenuptial agreement.” Instead, broach it in a conversational way by saying, “Let’s talk about a prenup.” Make it clear you are not expecting your marriage to end in divorce, but view a prenup the same as an insurance policy. No one expects to ever have to use it for an emergency, but it is nice to know it is there just in case.

Be clear about why you think it is a good idea. Explain any life experience you had that leads you to believe you need this agreement to be in place before you get married.

Listen and Negotiate the Pre-Marriage Agreement Upfront

Listen to the concerns of your future spouse. Understand the objections and be willing to negotiate.  If coming to an agreement seems impossible, work with a marriage prenup mediator who can assist you in writing the agreement together.

Allow for Changes in the Final Prenuptial

The prenup covers events that have not yet happened. As time passes, there may be a need to change the terms. Provide for this contingency in your original plan. You can also add a “sunset clause” provision whereby the agreement will expire on a certain date.

After the two of you have agreed to have a prenup, contact a Georgia family law attorney who will know how to draft the agreement so it meets Georgia’s prenuptial agreement legal requirements.

Source

http://www.businessinsider.com/how-to-ask-for-prenup-2014-9

https://www.entrepreneur.com/article/227088

Unique Issues in a Same Sex Prenuptial Agreement

lesbian-couple-with-childIn June 2015, the Supreme Court of the United States ruled that same sex marriage was legal in all 50 states. This means that all Georgia marriage laws, including ones applicable to prenuptial agreements, apply to the same way to same sex couples as they do to heterosexual ones. But, there are some unique issues pertaining to some same sex marriages that need to be addressed. Family law attorneys strongly urge same-sex couples to draft a prenuptial agreement considering, at a minimum, the following issues.

  • How long they have lived together as though married. Many same sex couples have lived together for many years.  One party may have stayed home with the children while the other one worked outside the home. One party may have worked while the other pursued education. Will there be alimony in the event of a divorce? If so, the court will only consider the contributions of each party to the marriage from the date of the marriage. In a prenuptial agreement, the couple can make a statement about the contributions each have made to the relationship and agree upon a date earlier than the date of the marriage that can be used for making alimony decisions.
  • Determine which assets and debts are joint and which are separate. The couple may have assets, such as a home, and bank accounts that are only in one of their names. Under Georgia law, assets brought into the marriage are not divided during the divorce proceedings. Only property acquired during the course of the marriage is considered marital property. A prenuptial agreement can designate these as joint assets. Debts can also be dealt with in the prenup.

Source

http://www.divorcelawinfo.com/states/ga/gapropdiv.htm

http://www.divorcesupport.com/divorce/Georgia-Premarital-and-Prenuptial-Agreements-3644.html